Are teeth bones?

Are teeth bones?

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Are teeth bones?

Lots of patents have asked are teeth considered bones due to the fact that teeth are strong and white, just like bones? Teeth are largely constructed by calcium, much like bones. They have a strong outer casing and a softer interior portion, much like bones. Let’s answer the questions about teeth and bones and their differences.

What are bones made of?

Bones are mostly made of collagen, which is a type of protein that’s made up of calcium phosphate, which is a mineral. Collagen gives your bones their soft framework, while calcium phosphate makes them strong and hard.

Bones are a living tissues, so they are constantly changing and regenerating. Old bone tissue is broken down and removed, while new tissue is created to replace the old. This keeps your bones strong and healthy.

What are teeth made of?

Teeth are mostly calcium “also called calcium phosphate”. Calcium is a mineral that plays a structural role in your body. Tooth enamel is the single hardest substance in your body. Because it is almost entirely calcium phosphate, it is incredibly tough. Calcium is a vital component to both teeth and bone tissue. Without enough calcium, your bones will become weak and the teeth will become softer and more porous.

Teeth are made out of enamel, it protects the inner, more fragile areas of your teeth, known as dentin and pulp. It’s the first and most important line of defense against tooth decay. If your enamel is damaged, you may develop cavities, temperature sensitivity, and even get a tooth infection.

Dentin lies beneath the enamel and is very susceptible to bacteria which can cause dental sensitivity and even cavities. Beneath your tooth’s enamel, there’s a bone-like tissue called dentin, which makes up most of your teeth’s structure. It’s susceptible to the bacteria that cause tooth sensitivity and cavities. The soft core portion of your tooth is called the pulp. The pulp is the living core of a tooth and is made up of nerves and vessels running through it.

Cementum is present in the next layer of connective tissue and is responsible for keeping your teeth attached to the gum and bone. It’s a bone-like structure that surrounds the root of your tooth. It helps to attach the tooth to the bone surrounding the tooth. No new enamel will form and without properly treating the tooth, the problem will only worsen over time.

What is the difference?

The biggest difference between teeth and bones are how they heal. When a bone breaks, your body will begin the healing process producing soft callus made of collagen forms on the broken tissue. As you continue to heal, hard callus forms as new bone tissue is produced. Teeth on the other hand, do not have the ability to heal like bones because it can’t create a callus to heal itself. So, if your enamel gets damaged or if you develop a cavity, your dentist will need to help you out.

Why do you protect your teeth?

Since your teeth don’t regenerate, it’s essential to protect them. Fortunately, maintaining a great oral hygiene routine can help keep your teeth in tip-top shape. This is why it’s critical to practice good oral hygiene habits such as brushing regularly, flossing, using mouthwash, and visiting your dentist every six to ensure that you are preventing future damage to your teeth.

Dental issues usually happen when you least expect. Oral care practices should be routine from morning until bedtime. By maintaining your oral health, you can prevent dental problems from getting worse. If you are experiencing dental issues contact our team at Stonelodge Dental, our team of highly trained and dedicated professionals can help guide you towards the best solution for your missing tooth.

Dr. Prida is committed to helping you and your family maintain excellent oral health for life. If you are missing a tooth or teeth and would like more information about your options,  schedule an appointment online call 214-613-1500 today.

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